Megillat Eicha: How Do We Respond to Tragedy?

Megillat Eicha: How Do We Respond to Tragedy?

Rabbi Hayyim Angel

Rabbi Hayyim Angel

Contributor


Description

Reading the Book of Eicha is arguably the most essential part of Tisha B’Av, but this book can feel archaic and difficult to relate to. \n\nIn 586 BCE, the Babylonians breach the wall of Jerusalem, burning the beautiful city to the ground. Other nations mocked Israel, looted her wealth, and even turned Jewish captives over to the Babylonian enemy. It was in this predicament that the Book of Lamentation (or Eicha) was written. Composed of just five chapters, Megillat Eicha is dedicated to mourning the loss of Jerusalem and confronting God during this terrible crisis. It's written from the perspective of an eyewitness, traditionally thought to be Jeremiah. \n\nOne may think that during such an incredibly devastating tragedy that the poem of Eicha would be chaos, and yet it follows a highly structured poetic artifice that one would expect from a calm and thought-out narrative. What is this distinctive structure teaching us on Tisha B’av about this tragic event? \n\nJoin Rabbi Hayyim Angel as he re-examines each chapter of Megillat Eicha and dissects the hidden messages in its structure – and never think about destruction and loss on Tisha B’av the same way again. If you’ve ever struggled to connect to Eicha, watch this course.